Washington Post, Slate and Newsweek all have actual ties to Russia… see the details

Monday, May 21, 2018 by

Since before President Donald J. Trump took office the so-called “Mainstream” media was doing its best to convict him in the court of public opinion of “colluding” with the Russians to “steal the election” from Hillary Clinton.

In story after story, the legacy media published one suggestive story after another, each only alleging that something nefarious took place but, several paragraphs into each piece meekly acknowledging that, in reality, no evidence of criminal activity or “collusion” had been found.

But as it turns out many of these same legacy media outlets are the ones who have nefarious business ties to Russia — including the Left-wing Slate, Washington Post, and Newsweek, among others.

In fact, according to an investigation by The Daily Caller, those news organizations and some very large Internet-based social media companies like Facebook and AOL also share the same times to Russian firms:

A dozen major American media and Internet outlets hired a Russian company called EastBanc Technologies to help with IT and web services, according to a Daily Caller News Foundation investigation. The companies include The Washington Post, Time, Newsweek, Slate, Facebook, AOL, Comcast and U.S. News & World Report.

The news site noted that former U.S. intelligence officers have deeply criticized those same media outlets for their rampant hypocrisy in retaining the services of a Russian firm, while at the same time pointing a finger at Team Trump and others within the president’s circles who have, at best, inconsequential ties to Russia.

In addition to the hypocrisy, the same former intelligence officials also called the American media companies extremely naive for trusting their cybersecurity to a company based in a hostile foreign nation. (Related: Where WERE they? Same media ripping VP Pence for sitting during Korean anthem PRAISED NFL players for kneeling during American anthem.)

“This clearly is a hypocrisy issue,” said retired Col. James Waurishuk, a former deputy director for intelligence at the U.S. Central Command and a senior national security analyst with the National Security Council under President George H.W. Bush. “All of the media companies have reported Trump and the Russian collusion story that all things Russians are bad. So why are they doing business with a Russian company?”

Though EastBanc is incorporated in Washington, D.C., and on the surface, it looks like a stand-alone American information technology firm, it’s not. A counterpart firm, also called EastBanc, is based in Novosibirsk, Russia, which is located in Siberia.

“The company’s office is located in the Academgorodok of Novosibirsk,” according to the company’s Russian-language website, which was translated via Google Translate. “There are more than 100 specialists in the staff.”

Major intelligence risk as well

The company provides typical IT services — data analytics, business intelligence, and cloud services, among others. The relationship between both firms is located in a 2014 PowerPoint presentation produced by the company, which posted Russian and U.S. officers side by side along with their U.S. and Russian clients.

Since Trump won the 2016 — quite unexpectedly, given the pre-election polling data nearly everyone believed — the U.S. “mainstream” press has been hammering home the false narrative that Trump and Moscow colluded, and that Team Trump members have nefarious and illegal connections to the Russian government. 

But come to find out U.S. media and Internet companies comprise EastBanc’s biggest client collection, 12 of 54 listed customers. “About a quarter of its clients listed on its American website are media and Internet companies,” The Daily Caller reported.

An editorial board member on NATO’s Defense Strategy Communications Journal, J. Michael Waller, told The Daily Caller that EastBanc’s ability to access the back end of American media and Internet companies could provide a boon of sensitive — and perhaps even classified — data to Russian government officials.

“Let’s say you’re Newsweek. And you have a reporter who’s been there for a long time, who has built his career with sources within the CIA,” he said. “Wouldn’t you, if you were Russian intelligence, want to know who his sources are within the CIA?”

Read more about Left-wing hypocrisy at Libtards.news.

J.D. Heyes is also editor-in-chief of The National Sentinel.

Sources include:

DailyCaller.com

NewsTarget.com



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